Download Harcourt School Publishers Trophies: Above Level Individual Reader Grade 1 Looking For Clue by by HARCOURT SCHOOL PUBLISHERS

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  • by: by HARCOURT SCHOOL PUBLISHERS
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  • ISBN-10: 0153268867
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  • Publosher: HARCOURT SCHOOL PUBLISHERS
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  • Add date: 13.09.2016
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Don't think me ungrateful,--don't think hard of me, any way,--I heard all you and master said tonight. I am going to try to save my boy--you will not blame me. God bless and reward you for all your kindness!" Hastily folding and directing this, she went to Harcourt School Publishers Trophies: Above Level Individual Reader Grade 1 Looking For Clue drawer and made up a little package of clothing for her boy, which she tied with a handkerchief firmly round her waist; and, so fond is a mother's remembrance, that, even in the terrors of that hour, she did not forget to put in the little package one or two of his favorite toys, reserving a gayly painted parrot to amuse him, when she should be called on to awaken him.

It was some trouble to arouse the little sleeper; but, after some effort, he sat up, and was playing with his bird, while his mother was putting on her bonnet and shawl. "Where are you going, mother?" said he, as she drew near the bed, with his little coat and cap. His mother drew near, and looked so earnestly into his eyes, that he at once divined that something unusual was the matter.

"Hush, Harry," she said; "mustn't speak loud, or they will hear us. A wicked man was coming to take little Harry away from his mother, and carry him 'way off in the dark; but mother won't let him--she's going to put on her little boy's cap and coat, and run off with him, so the Harcourt School Publishers Trophies: Above Level Individual Reader Grade 1 Looking For Clue man can't catch him.

" Saying these words, she had tied and buttoned on the child's simple outfit, Harcourt School Publishers Trophies: Above Level Individual Reader Grade 1 Looking For Clue, taking him in her arms, she whispered to him to be very still; and, opening a door in her room which led into the outer verandah, she glided noiselessly out. It was a sparkling, frosty, starlight night, and the mother wrapped the shawl close round her child, as, perfectly quiet with vague terror, he clung round her neck.

Old Bruno, a great Newfoundland, who slept at the end of the porch, rose, with a low growl, as she came near. She gently spoke his name, and the animal, an old pet and playmate of hers, instantly, wagging his tail, prepared to follow her, though apparently revolving much, in this simple dog's head, what such an indiscreet midnight promenade might mean. Some dim ideas of imprudence or impropriety in the measure seemed to embarrass him considerably; Harcourt School Publishers Trophies: Above Level Individual Reader Grade 1 Looking For Clue he often stopped, as Eliza glided forward, and looked wistfully, first at her and then at the house, and then, as if reassured by reflection, he pattered along after her again.

A few minutes brought them to the window of Uncle Tom's cottage, and Eliza stopping, tapped lightly on the window-pane. The prayer-meeting at Uncle Tom's had, in the order of hymn-singing, been protracted to a very late hour; and, as Uncle Tom had indulged himself in a few lengthy solos afterwards, the consequence was, that, although it was now between twelve and one o'clock, he and his worthy helpmeet were not yet asleep.

"Good Lord. what's that?" said Aunt Chloe, starting up and hastily drawing the curtain. "My sakes alive, if it an't Lizy. Get on your clothes, old man, quick!--there's old Bruno, too, a pawin round; what on airth. I'm gwine to open the door. " And suiting the action to the word, the door flew open, and the light of the tallow candle, which Tom had hastily lighted, fell on the haggard face and dark, wild eyes of the fugitive. "Lord bless you!--I'm skeered to look at ye, Lizy.

Are ye tuck sick, or what's come over ye?" "I'm running away--Uncle Tom and Aunt Chloe--carrying off my child--Master sold him!" "Sold him?" echoed both, lifting up their hands in dismay.

"Yes, sold him!" said Eliza, firmly; "I crept into the closet by Mistress' door tonight, and I heard Master tell Missis that he had sold my Harry, and you, Uncle Tom, both, to a trader; and that he was going off this morning on his horse, and that the man was to take possession today.

" Tom had stood, during this speech, with his hands raised, and his eyes dilated, like a man in a dream. Slowly and gradually, as its meaning came over him, he collapsed, rather than seated himself, on his old chair, and sunk his head down upon his knees. "The good Lord have pity on us!" said Aunt Chloe. it don't seem as if it was true. What has he done, that Mas'r should sell _him_?" "He hasn't done anything,--it isn't for that. Master don't want to sell, and Missis she's always good.

I heard her plead and beg for us; but he told her 't was no use; that he was in this man's debt, and that this man had got the power over him; and that if he didn't pay him off clear, it would end in his having to sell the place and all the people, and move off.

Yes, I heard him say there was no choice between selling these two and selling all, the man was driving him so hard. Master said he was sorry; but oh, Missis--you ought to have heard her talk. If she an't a Christian and an angel, there never was one.

I'm a wicked girl to leave her so; but, then, I can't help it.

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