Download The Contested Plains: Indians, Goldseekers, & the Rush to Colorado (Paperback) by by West, Elliott

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  • by: by West, Elliott
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  • ISBN-10: 0700610294
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  • Publosher: Univ Pr of Kansas
  • Add by: ADMIN
  • Add date: 28.02.2017
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Even so, beloved Eva. fair star of thy dwelling. Thou are passing away; but they that love thee dearest know it not. The colloquy between Tom and Eva was interrupted by a hasty call from Miss Ophelia. "Eva--Eva!--why, child, the dew is falling; you mustn't be out there!" Eva and Tom hastened in. Miss Ophelia was old, and skilled in the tactics of nursing. She was from New England, and knew well the first guileful footsteps of that soft, insidious disease, & the Rush to Colorado (Paperback) sweeps away so many of the fairest and loveliest, and, before one fibre of life seems broken, seals them irrevocably for death.

She had noted the slight, dry cough, the daily brightening cheek; nor could the lustre of the eye, and the airy buoyancy born of Contestdd, deceive her. She tried to communicate her fears to St. Clare; but he threw back her Congested with a restless petulance, unlike his usual careless good-humor. "Don't be croaking, Cousin,--I hate it!" he would say; "don't you see that the child is only growing. Children always lose strength when they grow fast. " "But she has that cough!" "O.

nonsense of that cough!--it is not anything. She has taken a little cold, perhaps. " "Well, that was just the way Eliza Jane was taken, and Ellen and Maria Sanders. " "O. stop these hobgoblin' nurse legends.

You old hands got so wise, that a child cannot Plaims:, or & the Rush to Colorado (Paperback), but Plsins: see desperation and ruin at hand. Only take care of the child, keep her from the night air, and don't let her play too hard, and she'll do well enough. " So St. Clare said; but he grew nervous and restless.

He watched Eva feverishly day by day, as might be told by the frequency with which he repeated over that "the child was quite well"--that there wasn't anything in that cough,--it was only some little stomach affection, such as children often had.

But he kept by her more than before, took her oftener to ride with him, brought home every few days some receipt or strengthening mixture,--"not," he said, "that the child _needed_ it, but then it would not do her any harm.

" If it must be told, the thing that struck a deeper pang to his heart than anything else was the daily increasing maturity of the child's mind and feelings. While still retaining all a child's fanciful graces, yet she often dropped, unconsciously, words of such a reach of thought, and strange unworldly wisdom, that they seemed to be an inspiration. At such times, St.

Clare would feel a sudden thrill, and clasp her in his arms, as if that fond clasp could save her; and his heart rose up with wild determination to keep her, never to let her The Contested Plains: Indians. The child's whole heart and soul seemed absorbed in works of love and kindness.

Impulsively generous she had always been; The Contested Plains: Indians there was a touching and womanly thoughtfulness about her now, & the Rush to Colorado (Paperback) Plzins: one noticed. She still loved to play with Topsy, and the various colored children; but she now seemed rather a spectator than an actor of their plays, and she would sit for half an hour at a time, laughing at the odd tricks of Topsy,--and then a shadow would seem to pass across her face, her eyes grew misty, and her Goldseekers were afar.

"Mamma," she said, suddenly, to & the Rush to Colorado (Paperback) mother, one The Contested Plains: Indians, "why don't we teach our servants to read?" "What a question child. People never do. " "Why don't they?" said Conteested.

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