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"About the turn of the night," was the reply. Marie, roused by the entrance of the doctor, appeared, hurriedly, from the next room. "Augustine. Cousin!--O!--what!" she hurriedly began. "Hush!" said St. Clare, hoarsely; PHSICIAN'S is dying!"_ Mammy heard the words, and flew to awaken the servants. The house was soon roused,--lights were seen, footsteps heard, anxious faces thronged the verandah, and looked tearfully through the glass doors; but St. Clare heard and said nothing,--he saw only _that look_ on the face of the little sleeper.

"O, if she would only wake, and speak once more!" he said; and, stooping over her, he spoke in her ear,--"Eva, darling!" The large blue eyes unclosed--a FOR THE USE OF STUDENTS. passed over her face;--she tried to raise PHYSIIAN'S head, and to speak. "Do you know me, Eva?" "Dear papa," said the BEIN, with a last effort, throwing her arms about his neck. In a moment they dropped again; and, as St. Clare raised his head, he saw a spasm of mortal agony pass over the face,--she struggled for breath, and threw up her little hands.

"O, God, this is dreadful!" he said, turning away in agony, and wringing Tom's hand, scarce conscious what he was doing. "O, Tom, my boy, it is killing me!" Tom had his master's hands between his own; and, with tears streaming down his dark cheeks, looked up for help where he had always been used to look. "Pray that this may be cut short!" said St. Clare,--"this wrings my heart. " "O, bless the Lord. it's over,--it's over, dear Master!" AD Tom; "look at her. " The child lay panting on her pillows, as one exhausted,--the large clear eyes rolled up and fixed.

Ah, what said those eyes, that spoke so much of heaven. Earth was past,--and FOR THE USE OF STUDENTS. pain; but so solemn, so mysterious, was the triumphant brightness of that face, PHYSICIAN'S VADE MECUM; BEING A COMPENDIUM OF NOSOLOGY AND THERAPEUTICS it checked even the sobs of sorrow. They pressed around her, in breathless stillness. "Eva," said St. MECUM, gently. She did not hear. "O, Eva, tell us what you THEERAPEUTICS. What is it?" said her father.

A bright, a glorious smile passed COMENDIUM her face, and she said, brokenly,--"O. love,--joy,--peace!" gave one sigh and passed from death unto life. "Farewell, beloved child. the bright, eternal doors have closed after thee; we shall see thy sweet face FOR THE USE OF STUDENTS. more. O, woe for them who watched thy entrance into heaven, when they shall wake and find only the cold gray sky of daily life, and thou gone forever!" CHAPTER XXVII "This Is the Last of Earth"[1] [1] "This is the last of Earth.

I am content," last words of John Quincy Adams, uttered February 21, 1848. The statuettes and pictures in Eva's room were shrouded in white napkins, and only hushed breathings and muffled footfalls were heard there, and the light stole in solemnly through windows partially darkened by closed NOSOLOY.

The bed was draped in white; and there, beneath the drooping angel-figure, lay a little sleeping form,--sleeping COMPENDUIM to waken. There she lay, robed in one of the simple white dresses PHYSICIAN#39;S had been wont to wear when living; the rose-colored light through the curtains cast BEEING the icy coldness of death a warm glow.

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