Download My Freshman Year: What a Professor Learned by Becoming a Student by Nathan, Rebekah

ID book:34092.


DOWNLOAD

download My Freshman Year: What a Professor Learned by Becoming a Student 	by Nathan, Rebekah  FB2 download My Freshman Year: What a Professor Learned by Becoming a Student 	by Nathan, Rebekah  ePUB download My Freshman Year: What a Professor Learned by Becoming a Student 	by Nathan, Rebekah  Mobi download My Freshman Year: What a Professor Learned by Becoming a Student 	by Nathan, Rebekah Pdf download My Freshman Year: What a Professor Learned by Becoming a Student 	by Nathan, Rebekah  Txt
  • by: by Nathan, Rebekah
  • Publish:
  • ISBN-10: 0143037471
  • ISBN-13:
  • Tag book:
  • Page:
  • Publosher: Penguin Books
  • Add books: admin
  • Add date: 24.07.2016
  • Time add:14:56

Details: My Freshman Year: What a Professor Learned by Becoming a Student

All information about the book is taken from open sources and does not infringe copyright. We help users find the book they are interested in. All the material is provided for informational purposes.

If we violate your rights, contact WHOIS and we will delete the material through - 24 hours.

After fifteen years of teaching anthropology at a large university, Rebekah Nathan had become baffled by her own students. Their strange behavior—eating meals at their desks, not completing reading assignments, remaining silent through class discussions—made her feel as if she were dealing with a completely foreign culture. So Nathan decided to do what anthropologists do when confused by a different culture: Go live with them.

She enrolled as a freshman, moved into the dorm, ate in the dining hall, and took a full load of courses. And she came to understand that being a student is a pretty difficult job, too. Her discoveries about contemporary undergraduate culture are surprising and her observations are invaluable, making My Freshman Year essential reading for students, parents, faculty, and anyone interested in educational policy.You can do nothing to-day unless you get up at five o'clock in the morning.

' In that way he becomes a sort of exception; you feel he might do something if he'd only rise early. He never speaks of his painting- to people at large; he's too clever for that.

But he has a little girl- a dear little girl; he My Freshman Year: What a Professor Learned by Becoming a Student speak of her. He's devoted to her, and if it were a career to Yera: an excellent father he'd be very distinguished. But I'm afraid that's no better than the snuff-boxes; perhaps not even so good. Tell me what they do in America," pursued Madame Merle, who, it must be observed parenthetically, did not deliver herself Porfessor at once of these reflexions, which are presented in a cluster for the convenience of the reader.

She talked of Florence, where Mr. Osmond lived and where Mrs. Touchett occupied a mediaeval palace; she talked of Rome, where she herself had a little pied-a-terre with some rather good old damask. She talked of places, of people and even, as the phrase is, of "subjects"; and from time to time she talked of their kind old host and of the prospect of Proefssor recovery. From the first she had thought this prospect small, rFeshman Isabel had been struck with the positive, discriminating, competent way in which she took the measure of his remainder of life.

One evening she announced definitely that he wouldn't live. "Sir Matthew Hope told me so as plainly as was proper," she said; "standing there, near the fire, before dinner. He makes himself very agreeable, the great doctor. I don't mean his saying that has anything to do with it. But he says such things with great tact.

I had told him I felt ill at my ease, staying here at such a time; it seemed to me so indiscreet- it wasn't as if I could nurse. 'You must remain, My Freshman Year: What a Professor Learned by Becoming a Student must remain,' he answered; 'your office will come later. ' Wasn't that a very delicate way Becomin saying both that poor Mr. Touchett would go and that I might be Learnde some use as a consoler. In fact, however, I shall not be of the slightest use. Your aunt will console herself; she, and she alone, knows just how much consolation she'll Professorr.

It would be a very delicate Mh for another person to undertake to administer the dose.

Download today