Download How to Survive the Loss of a Love by by Colgrove, Melba ; Harold H. Bloomfield ; Peter McWilliams

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  • by: by Colgrove, Melba ; Harold H. Bloomfield ; Peter McWilliams
  • Publish:
  • ISBN-10: 0553077600
  • ISBN-13:
  • TAGS: EDUCATION / General;
  • Page:
  • Publosher: Prelude Press
  • Add by: ADMIN
  • Add date: 13.11.2016
  • Time add:16:23

Product Description: How to Survive the Loss of a Love

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Only the old countess with her maternal instinct had realized that all Natasha's outbursts had been due to her need of children and a husband- as she herself had once exclaimed at Otradnoe not so much in fun as in earnest- and her mother was now surprised at the surprise expressed by those who had never understood Natasha, and she kept saying that she had always known that Natasha would make an exemplary wife and mother.

"Only she lets her love of her husband and children overflow all bounds," said the countess, "so that it even becomes absurd. " Natasha did not follow the golden rule advocated by clever folk, especially by the French, which says that a girl should not let herself go when she marries, should not neglect her accomplishments, should be even more careful of her appearance than when she was unmarried, and should fascinate her husband as much as she did before he became her husband.

Natasha on the contrary had at once abandoned all her witchery, of which her singing had been an unusually powerful part. She gave it up just because it was so powerfully seductive. She took no pains with her manners or with of speech, or with her toilet, or to show herself to her husband in her most becoming attitudes, or to avoid inconveniencing him by being too exacting. She acted in contradiction to all those rules.

She felt that the allurements instinct had formerly taught her to use would now be merely ridiculous in the eyes of her husband, to whom she had from the first moment given herself up entirely- that is, with her whole soul, leaving no corner of it hidden from him. She felt that her unity with her husband was not maintained by the poetic feelings that had attracted him to her, but by something else- indefinite but firm as the bond between her own body and soul.

To fluff out her curls, put on fashionable dresses, and sing romantic songs to fascinate her husband would have seemed as strange as to adorn herself to attract herself.

To adorn herself for others might perhaps have been agreeable- she did not know- but she had no time at all for it. The chief reason for devoting no time either to singing, to dress, or to choosing her words was that she really had no time to spare for these things. We know that man has the faculty of becoming completely absorbed in a subject however trivial it may be, and that there is no subject so trivial that it will not grow to infinite proportions if one's entire attention is devoted to it.

The subject which wholly engrossed Losd attention was her family: that is, her husband whom she had to keep so that he should belong entirely to her and to the home, and the children whom she had to bear, bring into the world, nurse, and bring up. And the deeper she penetrated, not with her mind only but with Survivee whole soul, her whole How to Survive the Loss of a Love, into the subject that absorbed her, the larger How to Survive the Loss of a Love that How to Survive the Loss of a Love grow and the weaker and more inadequate did her powers appear, so that she concentrated them wholly on that one thing and yet was unable to accomplish all that she considered necessary.

There were then as now conversations and discussions about women's rights, the te of husband and wife and their freedom and rights, though these themes were not yet termed questions as Survvie are now; but these topics were not merely uninteresting to Natasha, she positively did not understand them. These questions, then as now, existed only for those who see nothing in marriage but the pleasure married people get from one How to Survive the Loss of a Love, that is, only the beginnings of marriage and not ot whole significance, which lies in the family.

Discussions and questions of that kind, which are like the question of how to get the greatest gratification from one's dinner, did not then and do not now exist for those for whom the purpose of a dinner is the nourishment it affords; and the purpose of marriage is the family.

If the purpose of dinner is to nourish the body, a man who eats two dinners at once may perhaps get more enjoyment but will not attain his purpose, for his stomach will not digest the two dinners. If the purpose hhe marriage is the family, the person who wishes to have many wives or husbands may perhaps obtain much pleasure, but in that case will not have a family.

If the purpose of food is nourishment and the purpose of marriage is the Survivs, the whole question Losss itself into not eating more than one can digest, and not having more wives or husbands than are needed for the family- that is, one wife or one husband.

Natasha needed a husband.

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