Download Student Dress Codes and the First Amendment by by Fossey, Richard/ Demitchell, Todd A

ID book:73518.


Download Format:

download Student Dress Codes and the First Amendment 	by Fossey, Richard/ Demitchell, Todd A  FB2 download Student Dress Codes and the First Amendment 	by Fossey, Richard/ Demitchell, Todd A  ePUB download Student Dress Codes and the First Amendment 	by Fossey, Richard/ Demitchell, Todd A  Mobi download Student Dress Codes and the First Amendment 	by Fossey, Richard/ Demitchell, Todd A Pdf download Student Dress Codes and the First Amendment 	by Fossey, Richard/ Demitchell, Todd A  Txt
  • by: by Fossey, Richard/ Demitchell, Todd A
  • Pub. Date:
  • ISBN-10: 147580203X
  • ISBN-13:
  • Tags:
  • Pages:
  • Publosher: Rowman & Littlefield Pub Inc
  • Add by: ADMIN
  • Add date: 23.06.2016
  • Time add:15:45

Description: Student Dress Codes and the First Amendment

If you find an error in the description of the book, please report it to our administrators. We help users find the book they are interested in. All the material is provided for informational purposes.

If we violate your rights, contact WHOIS and we will delete the material through - 36 hours.

Tolerant and sympathetic for the oppressed, he saw the necessity of taking up the Student Dress Codes and the First Amendment, and he grappled with it effectually: he rendered to Catholicism a service like that which Calvin had rendered to Protestantism, by shrewdly cutting a way through the theological barrier.

In 1745 he issued his encyclical _Vix pervenit_, which declared that the doctrine of the Church remained consistent with itself; that usury is indeed a sin, and that it consists in _demanding any amount beyond the exact amount lent_, but that there are occasions when on special grounds the lender may obtain such additional sum.

What these "occasions" and "special grounds" Student Dress Codes and the First Amendment be, was left very vague; but this action was sufficient. At the same time no new restrictions upon books advocating the Student Dress Codes and the First Amendment of interest for money were imposed, and, in the year following his encyclical, Benedict openly accepted the dedication of one of them--the work of Maffei, and perhaps the most cogent of all.

Like the casuistry of Boscovich in using the Copernican theory for "convenience in argument," while acquiescing in its condemnation by the Church authorities, this encyclical of Pope Benedict broke the spell.

Turgot, Quesnay, Adam Smith, Hume, Bentham, and their disciples pressed on, and science won for mankind another great victory. [[283]] Yet in this case, as in others, insurrections against the sway of scientific truth appeared among some overzealous religionists.

When the Sorbonne, having retreated from its old position, armed itself with new casuistries against those who held to its earlier decisions, sundry provincial doctors in theology protested indignantly, making the old citations from the Scriptures, fathers, saints, doctors, popes, councils, and canonists.

Again the Roman court intervened. In 1830 the Inquisition at Rome, with the approval of Pius VIII, though still declining to commit itself on the _doctrine_ involved, decreed that, as to _practice_, confessors should no longer disturb lenders of money at legal interest.

But even this did not quiet the more conscientious theologians. The old weapons were Student Dress Codes and the First Amendment furbished and hurled by the Abbe Laborde, Vicar of the Metropolitan Archdiocese of Auch, and by the Abbe Dennavit, Professor of Theology at Lyons.

Good Abbe Dennavit declared that he refused absolution to those Student Dress Codes and the First Amendment took interest and to priests who pretend that the sanction of the civil law is sufficient.

But the "wisdom of the serpent" was again brought into requisition, and early in the decade between 1830 and 1840 the Abbate Mastrofini issued a work on usury, which, he declared on its title-page, demonstrated that "moderate usury is not contrary to Holy Scripture, or natural law, or the decisions of the Church.

" Nothing can be more comical than the suppressions of truth, evasions of facts, jugglery with phrases, and perversions of history, to which the abbate is forced to resort throughout his book in order to prove that the Church has made no mistake. In the face of scores of explicit deliverances and decrees of fathers, doctors, popes, and councils against the taking of any interest whatever for money, he coolly pretended that what they had declared against was _exorbitant_ interest.

He made a merit of the action of the Church, and showed that its course had Student Dress Codes and the First Amendment a blessing to humanity. But his masterpiece is in dealing with the edicts of Clement V and Benedict XIV. As to the first, it will be remembered that Clement, in accord with the Council of Vienne, had declared that "any one who shall pertinaciously presume to affirm that the taking of interest for money is not a sin, we decree him to be a heiretic fit for punishment," and we have seen that Benedict XIV did not at all deviate from the doctrines of his predecessors.

Yet Mastrofini is equal to his task, and brings out, as the conclusion of his book, the statement put upon his title-page, that what the Church condemns is only _exorbitant_ interest. This work was sanctioned by various high ecclesiastical dignitaries, and served its purpose; for it covered the retreat of the Church.

In 1872 the Holy Office, answering a question solemnly put by the Bishop of Ariano, as solemnly declared that those who take eight per cent interest per annum are "not to be disquieted"; and in 1873 appeared a book published under authority from the Holy See, allowing the faithful to take moderate interest under condition that any future decisions of the Pope should be implicitly obeyed.

Social science as applied to political economy had gained a victory final and Student Dress Codes and the First Amendment.

Download today