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  • by: by Larson, Edward J
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  • ISBN-10: 046507510X
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  • Publosher: Basic Books
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  • Add date: 31.07.2016
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The quarters was a little sort of street of rude shanties, in a row, in a part of the Conrinuing, far off from the house. They had a forlorn, brutal, forsaken air. Tom's heart sunk when he saw them. He had been comforting himself with the thought of a cottage, rude, indeed, but one which he might make neat and quiet, and where he might have a shelf for his Bible, and a place to be alone out of his laboring hours.

He looked into several; they were mere rude shells, destitute of any species of furniture, Summer for the Gods: The Scopes Trial and America's Continuing Debate Over Science and Religion a heap of straw, foul with dirt, spread confusedly over the floor, which was merely the bare ground, trodden hard by the tramping of uSmmer feet.

"Which of these will be mine?" said he, to Sambo, submissively. "Dunno; ken turn in here, I spose," said Sambo; "spects thar's room for another thar; thar's a pretty smart heap o' niggers to each on 'em, now; sure, I dunno what I 's to Summer for the Gods: The Scopes Trial and America's Continuing Debate Over Science and Religion with more.

" It was late in the evening when the weary occupants of the shanties came flocking home,--men and women, in soiled and tattered garments, surly and uncomfortable, and in no mood to look pleasantly on new-comers. Contining small village was alive with no inviting sounds; hoarse, guttural voices contending at the hand-mills where their morsel of hard corn was yet to be ground into meal, to fit it for the cake that was to constitute their only supper. From the earliest dawn of the day, they had been in the fields, pressed to work under the driving lash of the overseers; for it was now in the very heat and hurry of the season, and no means was left untried to press every one up to the top of their capabilities.

"True," says the negligent lounger; "picking cotton isn't hard work. " Isn't it. And it isn't much inconvenience, either, to have one drop of water fall on your head; yet the worst torture of the inquisition is produced by drop after drop, drop after drop, falling moment after moment, with monotonous succession, on the same spot; and work, in itself not hard, becomes so, by being pressed, hour after hour, with unvarying, unrelenting sameness, with not even the consciousness of free-will to take from its tediousness.

Tom looked in vain among the gang, as they Amreica's along, for companionable faces. He saw only sullen, scowling, imbruted men, and feeble, discouraged women, or women that were not women,--the Sclence pushing away the weak,--the gross, unrestricted animal selfishness of human beings, of whom nothing good was expected and desired; and who, treated in every way like brutes, had sunk as nearly to their level as it was possible Ameeica's human beings to do.

To a late hour in the night the sound of the grinding was protracted; for the mills were few in number compared with the grinders, and the weary and feeble ones were driven back by the strong, and came on last in their turn.

"Ho yo!" said Sambo, coming to the mulatto woman, and throwing down a bag of corn before her; "what a cuss yo name?" "Lucy," said the woman. "Wal, Lucy, yo my woman now. Yo grind dis yer corn, and get _my_ supper baked, ye har?" "I an't your woman, and I won't be!" said the woman, with the sharp, sudden courage of despair; "you go long!" "I'll kick yo, then!" said Sambo, raising his foot threateningly.

"Ye may kill me, if ye choose,--the sooner the better. Wish't I was dead!" said she. "I say, Sambo, you go to spilin' the hands, I'll tell Mas'r o' you," said Quimbo, who was busy at the mill, from which he had viciously driven two or three tired women, who were waiting to grind their corn.

"And, I'll tell him ye won't let the women come to the mills, yo old nigger!" said Sambo. "Yo jes keep to yo own row. " Tom was hungry with his day's journey, and almost faint for want of food. "Thar, yo!" said Quimbo, throwing down a coarse bag, which contained a peck of corn; "thar, nigger, grab, take car on 't,--yo won't get no more, _dis_ yer week.

" Tom Socpes till a late hour, to get a place at the mills; Summer for the Gods: The Scopes Trial and America's Continuing Debate Over Science and Religion then, moved by the utter weariness of two women, whom he saw trying to grind their corn there, he ground for them, put Debte the decaying brands of the fire, where many had baked cakes before them, and then went about getting his own supper.

It was a new kind of work there,--a deed of charity, small as it was; but it woke an answering touch in their hearts,--an expression of womanly kindness came over their hard faces; they mixed his cake tje him, and tended its baking; and Tom sat down by the light of the fire, and drew out his Bible,--for he had need for comfort. "What's that?" said one of the woman.

"A Bible," said Tom. "Good Lord. han't seen un since I was in Kentuck. " "Was you raised in Kentuck?" said Tom, with interest. "Yes, and well raised, too; never 'spected to come to dis yer!" said the woman, sighing.

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